University of Saskatchewan’s Honeyberries

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Since receiving funding from Saskatchewan Agriculture in 2006, The University of Saskatchewan, under Dr. Bob Bors direction have made controlled crosses, between Japanese, Russian and Kuril parentage, resulting in thousands of Haskap seedlings. This research program has seen impressive results in faster-growing plants and larger and more flavorsome berries.

Early Harvesting varieties –

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Mid Harvesting varieties –

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Late Harvesting varieties –

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Very Late Harvesting varieties –

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http://www.lovehoneyberry.com/contact-us/

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Plant leader in the Candian Haskap industry

Since receiving funding from Saskatchewan Agriculture in 2006, The University of Saskatchewan, under Dr. Bob Bors direction have made controlled crosses, between Japanese, Russian and Kuril parentage, resulting in thousands of Haskap seedlings. This research program has seen impressive results in faster-growing plants and larger and more flavoursome berries. Their goal is to combine the best traits from different regions to adapt this crop for mechanical harvesting under the varietal name – Haskap and suited to warmer areas.

Their new Haskap varieties (Boreal Beauty and Boreal Blizzard) continue to improve since the introduction of Borealis (2007) with the introduction of higher parental breeding quality. Most of their advanced breeding material are based on hybridising germplasm from Maxine Thompson (Formally Oregon State University) from material sourced in Japan, Russia and Europe, Jim Gilbert (Northwood’s Nursery) and Maria Plekhanova (Vavilov Institute, Russia).

Dr. Bob Bors is the Head of the Domestic Fruit Program and an Assistant Professor in the Department of the Plant Sciences University of Saskatchewan, and lead’s Canada’s development of Haskap berries. He began in 1999 to head the Fruit Program at the University. Bob obtained a BSC from the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. from the University of Guelph. Bob’s research focuses on breeding, tissue culture, propagation, disease screening, and interspecific hybridization of horticultural crops with emphasis on fruit and ornamentals.

Dr. Bors will share his research experience growing and breeding cold-tolerant fruit, as well as techniques for selecting which fruits to grow in the north.

UoS Plants in the Orchard

University of Saskatchewan's Honeyberries

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In the tables below, we have listed the key variables to allow you to choose the right varieties to combine. The basic rule is the larger the ‘plant mass’, the greater number of berries. However, please remember the highest producers do not always produce the tastiest berries. In many cases the smaller yielders (Honey Gin) or tarter tasting cultivars (Happy Giant) allow you to improve your ‘Honeyberry Blend’ for its intended use.

Please remember plant inter-row spacing is critical for the health of the plant. If you plant Happy Giant or Aurora on two or three feet row spacing. It is very unlikely you will end up with a healthy plant or the stated yield. For example, the natural plant mass of Happy Giant is 150 cubic feet (Height x Width x Depth). If you planted it o a two-foot spacing, you would reduce its plant mass to 60 cubic feet and reduce its yield to about four pounds per plant. So your plant spacing strategy is planting disappointment.

In general, Honeyberries are ripe to harvest on a Brix of 15 and higher. The newer sweeter variety’s Brix continues to rise and in many cases, these, when grown under the suitable and luxury conditions, can achieve Brix in the low to mid-twenties.

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University of Saskatchewan’s Honeyberries

University of Saskatchewan's Honeyberries

University of Saskatchewan's varities

Haskap

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LoveHoneyberry

Our commitment at LoveHoneyberry is to enable you, to quickly establish a profitable Honeyberry orchard, by eliminating many of the high start-up and ongoing errors associated with a new fruit.

We are very passionate about the opportunities that Honeyberries offers growers (in particular organic) and encourage you to see these initial Honeyberry plant ordering costs as only a fraction of the lifetime revenue potential from fresh or frozen berry sales or Honeyberry value added products.

We can ship Honeyberry or Haskap in-vitro plantlets or potted plants to most regions in the world, where the plants can thrive.

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